Maternal health is a key health indicator.

Maternal Health Text

Source: South Carolina Mother and Child Health Data Book 2013

The number of live births has decreased.

The number of live births in Greenville peaked in 2008, at 6,695 births.

Source: South Carolina Mother and Child Health Data Book, 2013

Most births are to white; but other ethnicities are growing.

While most births in Greenville county are to white mothers, the number of births is growing among other racial and ethnic groups.

Additionally, the fertility rate among Hispanic worm has seen a dramatic drop since its peak in 2007.

 

Source: South Carolina Mother and Child Health Data Book, 2013

Births to "at risk" mothers has dropped slightly.

Births to at risk mothers, those under age 18 and those will less than a high school education has dropped slightly in Greenville and in South Carolina, and Greenville performs slightly better than the state. Births to single mothers, currently 39% of births, has not changed dramatically.

In South Carolina, births to Medicaid mothers has increased. the births to Medicaid mothers has stayed the same for Greenville white and black mothers, but has dropped for Hispanic mothers.

Source: South Carolina Mother and Child Health Data Book, 2013

Mortality rates have remained stable.

The fetal and infant mortality rates have remained relatively stable for Grenville, the region, and the state since 2003.

Source: South Carolina Mother and Child Health Data Book, 2013

Greenville is 41st in the state in low birth weight births.

Out of over 42,000 live births in Greenville County, 3,620 are low birth weight births, or almost 9%. This is slightly lower than South Carolina’s 10%, but well above the national benchmark of 6%.

Source: South Carolina Mother and Child Health Data Book, 2013

Teen pregnancy and birth rates are also falling.